DACA

On June 15, 2012, President Obama stated that undocumented young people who met the criteria outlined, would be able to apply for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or DACA protection for two years, subject to renewal. In September 2017, Trump announced that he was ending DACA. He said that he would give Congress six months to come to a resolution for DACA recipients.

There have been numerous law suits filed to block Trump's repeal of DACA. In California and New York, federal courts have ruled that the government must continue accepting DACA applications from current or former DACA recipients and applicants nationwide. A federal court in the District of Columbia also ruled in favor of DACA recipients and applicants. The court ruled that the government had 90 days to provide more support for rescinding DACA, and if they fail to do so then the D.C. court said that the government must accept new applications in addition to renewals.

The debate over the fate of DACA still persists in Washington and across national federal courts today. Under current pending court injunctions, DACA recipients can still renew their application every two years. However, eligible immigrants who did not previously apply for DACA are currently not able to do so right now.

Many predict that the Supreme Court will hear a case on DACA's fate in October 2019.